Phil Montanez

Club scheduling conflicts with student involvement

By: Philip Montanez
Contributor

While County College of Morris sets aside 12:30 p.m. to 1:45 p.m. every Tuesday and Thursday for College Hour, a block where the college limits scheduling classes with the intention of increasing club involvement, some students are unable to participate in most clubs when their classes coincide with the block.

According to CCM’s website, there are between 45 to 50 active organizations in the facility that highlight their offerings at the start of every semester. These range from honors societies to major-specific clubs and physical activities that include frisbee and rock climbing.

Being that registrations are earlier than the club fairs and many students try to make their class schedules a closed block of time means some clubs may not see the involvement they desire.

“I have classes scheduled right now during College Hour, and it limits me on how involved I can get on campus,” said Andrew Kelly, a communication major at CCM. “I wasn’t that involved at my last college, and I want to build my resume and get a more meaningful experience out of college.”

There then arises people who desire to become associated with a group but were not made aware of the opportunities given to them in a timely manner.

Nursing major Mohammad Abdeljabbar was also interested in the clubs but found himself unable to attend what he would have seen as a fun experience.

“I wanted to do rock climbing, but I feel like my anatomy and physiology courses interfered between 8 a.m. and 3 p.m.,” Abdeljabbar said. “They ended up overlapping.”

Some students who are currently involved in campus clubs and organizations also feel the effects of College Hour’s location in the day.

Chelsey Vazquez, Active Minds president and a biology health-related student studying the liberal arts, has seen the repercussions of this scheduling in her time at CCM.

Active Minds is a group that aims to learn and raise awareness on mental health issues in college and in life. Consistently, the group sees approximately 10 active members during the week, and Vasquez believes she knows why.

“I feel like for a community college, we have many active clubs on campus, but the challenges are that people have commitments off campus,” Vasquez said. “The mismatched schedules cause people to become uninvolved. I do believe it has to do with students not living on campus, but the school does try to help with the clubs. There is communication but not involvement.”