Travel teaches students culture

BY VALENTINA MARMELEJO

Features Writer

“My initial feelings when entering Langa were sorrow, and almost a feeling of guilt as being an outsider. I felt guilty because once the tour was over I could go back to a life of luxury, while they will always be there.” Hope Motzenbecker, a communication major at County College of Morris, spent her spring break visiting Cape Town, South Africa.

On her trip, she explored some of South Africa’s hiking trails and picturesque views, but she says that the most memorable part of the trip was her visit to a township called Langa. A township is a term normally used in South Africa to refer to the often underdeveloped urban living areas that, from the late 19th century until the end of apartheid, were reserved for non-white residents.

Motzenbecker described the majority of the homes in Langa as huts made of scraps of metal. The people that wanted electricity wired their homes themselves. Motzenbecker said that the people of Langa did not have running water or plumbing, so they would wait on a long line in order to use portable toilets.

“It was a very moving experience,” Motzenbecker said. “I learned a lot. It not only made me feel fortunate for what I have, but it also made me more aware of what South Africans went through during apartheid.”

While her trip brought Motzenbecker closer to history, other CCM students took different messages away from their trips abroad.

“They live a simpler life and they appreciate the little things,” said Saira Islam, biology major at CCM, about her trip to visit her family in Pakistan. She said that the people she encountered through her family were friendly and made her feel comfortable even though she was considered a foreigner.

Islam said she recalled how happy her grandparents and their neighbors were when it rained in their village for the first time in four years.

Nina Thoguluva, a chemistry major at CCM, echoed similar sentiments regarding a vacation she had taken to Cancun, Mexico.

“The people were, I don’t know if humble is the right word, but they seemed like they were just trying to get through the day,” Thoguluva said.

Thoguluva described one day where she and her family decided to ride bikes outside of their resort. She said she noticed that the roads were unpaved and that the small houses outside had a lack of structure, which stood out compared to the comparative wealth of her resort and the U.S. as a whole.

“I think it’s important to travel outside of the country because it helps you get a different perspective on life,” Thoguluva said.

By Valentina Marmolejo

Features Writer

“My initial feelings when entering Langa were sorrow, and almost a feeling of guilt as being an outsider. I felt guilty because once the tour was over I could go back to a life of luxury, while they will always be there.” Hope Motzenbecker, a communication major at County College of Morris, spent her spring break visiting Cape Town, South Africa.

On her trip, she explored some of South Africa’s hiking trails and picturesque views, but she says that the most memorable part of the trip was her visit to a township called Langa. A township is a term normally used in South Africa to refer to the often underdeveloped urban living areas that, from the late 19th century until the end of apartheid, were reserved for non-white residents.

Motzenbecker described the majority of the homes in Langa as huts made of scraps of metal. The people that wanted electricity wired their homes themselves. Motzenbecker said that the people of Langa did not have running water or plumbing, so they would wait on a long line in order to use portable toilets.

“It was a very moving experience,” Motzenbecker said. “I learned a lot. It not only made me feel fortunate for what I have, but it also made me more aware of what South Africans went through during apartheid.”

While her trip brought Motzenbecker closer to history, other CCM students took different messages away from their trips abroad.

“They live a simpler life and they appreciate the little things,” said Saira Islam, biology major at CCM, about her trip to visit her family in Pakistan. She said that the people she encountered through her family were friendly and made her feel comfortable even though she was considered a foreigner.

Islam said she recalled how happy her grandparents and their neighbors were when it rained in their village for the first time in four years.

Nina Thoguluva, a chemistry major at CCM, echoed similar sentiments regarding a vacation she had taken to Cancun, Mexico.

“The people were, I don’t know if humble is the right word, but they seemed like they were just trying to get through the day,” Thoguluva said.

Thoguluva described one day where she and her family decided to ride bikes outside of their resort. She said she noticed that the roads were unpaved and that the small houses outside had a lack of structure, which stood out compared to the comparative wealth of her resort and the U.S. as a whole.

“I think it’s important to travel outside of the country because it helps you get a different perspective on life,” Thoguluva said.

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